The U.S. House impeached current President Donald Trump for a historic second time on Wednesday, Jan. 13, charged with “incitement of insurrection” over the deadly mob siege of the U.S. Capitol in a swift and stunning collapse.

The impeachment resolution was voted on by 232 members of the House. The votes of Democratic congressmen would have been enough to pass the decision, but impeachment was also supported by at least 10 of Trump’s fellow Republican party members.

Trump is the only U.S. president to be twice impeached. It was the most bipartisan presidential impeachment in modern times, more so than against Bill Clinton in 1998. In order to impeach Trump, the Senate and a two-thirds majority are needed.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi invoked Abraham Lincoln and the Bible, imploring lawmakers to uphold their oath to defend the Constitution from all enemies, foreign “and domestic.”

She said of Trump: “He must go, he is a clear and present danger to the nation that we all love.”

Holed up at the White House, watching the proceedings on TV, Trump later released a video statement in which he made no mention at all of the impeachment but appealed to his supporters to refrain from any further violence or disruption of Biden’s inauguration.

“Like all of you, I was shocked and deeply saddened by the calamity at the Capitol last week,” he said, his first condemnation of the attack. He appealed for unity “to move forward” and said, “Mob violence goes against everything I believe in and everything our movement stands for. … No true supporter of mine could ever disrespect law enforcement.”